Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Savings Opportunities for Students With Special Needs

Saving for a child's or grandchild's college can be complicated enough, but things become even more complex when that child has a disability. Often times, families aren't sure if the child will pursue higher education or decide to take another path instead. But perhaps the biggest challenge individuals with special needs face is being able to save enough for college without having to forfeit government benefits. If a person with a disability earns more than $700 per month, or has savings or other assets in excess of $2,000, they risk losing eligibility for programs like Medicaid. Because of these roadblocks, parents who have children with special needs have to look beyond traditional bank and investment accounts in order to build substantial savings. Historically, one of the only options available was a special needs trust, which can be an effective savings tool for families but has limitations such as the inability to fund housing and food expenses and costs and perceived complexity associated with trusts. And as a result, students with disabilities end up with little or no savings and no plan for college. Yet what these families should realize is that there are, in fact, a number of opportunities for students with disabilities to continue their education as well as save for it. Available higher education opportunities Kathleen Oberneder, Wealth Management Advisor at Crescendo Wealth Management, had worked several years in the financial services sector prior to her daughter Emily being born with Down syndrome. Having two older daughters, Oberneder clearly understood the higher education planning process, but she wasn't sure where to start when it came time to plan for Emily's future. However, she was pleasantly surprised when she discovered that there are actually a number of high education opportunities across the country for Emily and other students who have disabilities. In fact, there are currently over 200 university programs offering programs that cater to individuals with special needs. 529 college savings plans One way for families to save for college for a child with special needs is with a 529 plan. To avoid affecting the asset limitations mentioned above, parents or grandparents should be listed as the account owner, with the child named as the beneficiary. With a 529 plan, investment earnings will grow tax-free as long as the funds are used toward the beneficiary's college expenses. And in the event that the child decides not to go to college, the beneficiary can be easily changed to another family member. RELATED: What is a 529 plan? 529 ABLE accounts Additionally, a new savings option was recently introduced, 529 ABLE Accounts, which were made available through the passage of the Steven Beck Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience Act. This law was effective December 2014 but accounts have only been made available as of June 2016. Currently, there are four states that offer ABLE Accounts ï ¿ ½ Florida, Nebraska, Ohio and Tennessee, and these plans are available to families nationwide. Essentially, the ABLE Act allows individuals who have been diagnosed with a disability before the age of 26 to save money in ABLE accounts and not jeopardize government benefits. Tax-free distributions from an ABLE account may be made for ï ¿ ½qualified disability expenses.ï ¿ ½ The term ï ¿ ½qualified disability expensesï ¿ ½ permits the inclusion of basic living expenses with examples including costs for education, housing, transportation, employment training, and many others. 529 ABLE Accounts are the first savings tools available that formally recognize the added costs of saving for people living with disabilities, and recognize that their families often require more flexibility to care for their loved ones. Oberneder has made it her life's work to financially plan for families with special needs children and adults, and sees ABLE accounts as a way to fund and save for expenses that improve the quality of life for special needs families. One example is horse therapy, which can be a highly beneficial addition to treatment programs for children with autism. The rhythmic motion of riding a horse allows a rider to focus on the slow, deliberate, and calming movement. The child indirectly learns how to focus better, which is aided by the comforting effect of riding. These types of therapy are not covered by government benefits, but can paid for with funds from a 529 ABLE Account. It's important to understand that ABLE accounts don't necessarily have to replace existing accounts like 529 plans or other planning tools such as a special needs trust. However, ABLE accounts should be considered a tool and part of the overall special needs planning process. For additional eligibility information, requirements, limitations and resource links on ABLE accounts please visit http://www.crescendowm.com/p/able-accounts. RELATED: The ABLE Act and what it means for your 529 plan SECURITIES AND ADVISORY SERVICES OFFERED THROUGH LPL FINANCIAL, A REGISTERED INVESTMENT ADVISOR, MEMBER FINRA/SIPC. The LPL Registered Representative associated with this webpage may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, CO, FL, IL, MN, NC, NE, PA, TX, VA, and WI. Third Party Post found on this profile do not reflect the views of LPL Financial and have not been reviewed by LPL Financial as to accuracy and completeness. Author: Brooke Napiwocki, Wealth Management Advisor, Crescendo Wealth Management, Guest Contributor Brooke Napiwocki, CFPï ¿ ½, MBA is a Wealth Management Advisor at Crescendo Wealth Management in Southeastern, Wisconsin. She focuses her practice on professional women and couples who are seeking a holistic approach to financial and life planning. Brooke has advised individuals, small businesses, and institutional clients in the financial services industry for the past 15 years. Saving for a child's or grandchild's college can be complicated enough, but things become even more complex when that child has a disability. Often times, families aren't sure if the child will pursue higher education or decide to take another path instead. But perhaps the biggest challenge individuals with special needs face is being able to save enough for college without having to forfeit government benefits. If a person with a disability earns more than $700 per month, or has savings or other assets in excess of $2,000, they risk losing eligibility for programs like Medicaid. Because of these roadblocks, parents who have children with special needs have to look beyond traditional bank and investment accounts in order to build substantial savings. Historically, one of the only options available was a special needs trust, which can be an effective savings tool for families but has limitations such as the inability to fund housing and food expenses and costs and perceived complexity associated with trusts. And as a result, students with disabilities end up with little or no savings and no plan for college. Yet what these families should realize is that there are, in fact, a number of opportunities for students with disabilities to continue their education as well as save for it. Available higher education opportunities Kathleen Oberneder, Wealth Management Advisor at Crescendo Wealth Management, had worked several years in the financial services sector prior to her daughter Emily being born with Down syndrome. Having two older daughters, Oberneder clearly understood the higher education planning process, but she wasn't sure where to start when it came time to plan for Emily's future. However, she was pleasantly surprised when she discovered that there are actually a number of high education opportunities across the country for Emily and other students who have disabilities. In fact, there are currently over 200 university programs offering programs that cater to individuals with special needs. 529 college savings plans One way for families to save for college for a child with special needs is with a 529 plan. To avoid affecting the asset limitations mentioned above, parents or grandparents should be listed as the account owner, with the child named as the beneficiary. With a 529 plan, investment earnings will grow tax-free as long as the funds are used toward the beneficiary's college expenses. And in the event that the child decides not to go to college, the beneficiary can be easily changed to another family member. RELATED: What is a 529 plan? 529 ABLE accounts Additionally, a new savings option was recently introduced, 529 ABLE Accounts, which were made available through the passage of the Steven Beck Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience Act. This law was effective December 2014 but accounts have only been made available as of June 2016. Currently, there are four states that offer ABLE Accounts ï ¿ ½ Florida, Nebraska, Ohio and Tennessee, and these plans are available to families nationwide. Essentially, the ABLE Act allows individuals who have been diagnosed with a disability before the age of 26 to save money in ABLE accounts and not jeopardize government benefits. Tax-free distributions from an ABLE account may be made for ï ¿ ½qualified disability expenses.ï ¿ ½ The term ï ¿ ½qualified disability expensesï ¿ ½ permits the inclusion of basic living expenses with examples including costs for education, housing, transportation, employment training, and many others. 529 ABLE Accounts are the first savings tools available that formally recognize the added costs of saving for people living with disabilities, and recognize that their families often require more flexibility to care for their loved ones. Oberneder has made it her life's work to financially plan for families with special needs children and adults, and sees ABLE accounts as a way to fund and save for expenses that improve the quality of life for special needs families. One example is horse therapy, which can be a highly beneficial addition to treatment programs for children with autism. The rhythmic motion of riding a horse allows a rider to focus on the slow, deliberate, and calming movement. The child indirectly learns how to focus better, which is aided by the comforting effect of riding. These types of therapy are not covered by government benefits, but can paid for with funds from a 529 ABLE Account. It's important to understand that ABLE accounts don't necessarily have to replace existing accounts like 529 plans or other planning tools such as a special needs trust. However, ABLE accounts should be considered a tool and part of the overall special needs planning process. For additional eligibility information, requirements, limitations and resource links on ABLE accounts please visit http://www.crescendowm.com/p/able-accounts. RELATED: The ABLE Act and what it means for your 529 plan SECURITIES AND ADVISORY SERVICES OFFERED THROUGH LPL FINANCIAL, A REGISTERED INVESTMENT ADVISOR, MEMBER FINRA/SIPC. The LPL Registered Representative associated with this webpage may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: AZ, CA, CO, FL, IL, MN, NC, NE, PA, TX, VA, and WI. Third Party Post found on this profile do not reflect the views of LPL Financial and have not been reviewed by LPL Financial as to accuracy and completeness. Author: Brooke Napiwocki, Wealth Management Advisor, Crescendo Wealth Management, Guest Contributor Brooke Napiwocki, CFPï ¿ ½, MBA is a Wealth Management Advisor at Crescendo Wealth Management in Southeastern, Wisconsin. She focuses her practice on professional women and couples who are seeking a holistic approach to financial and life planning. Brooke has advised individuals, small businesses, and institutional clients in the financial services industry for the past 15 years.

Sunday, May 24, 2020

The Influence of Traditional Western Law on the...

Intro to Law Assessment 1 – Essay 35% To what extent did the concepts and institutions of the Western legal tradition influence the colony of New South Wales and, ultimately, the development of the Australian legal system? The concepts and institutions of the Western legal tradition, namely common and statute law, the court system and the Bill of Rights, influenced the colony of New South Wales, and ultimately, the development of the Australian legal system to a great extent. Although the concepts and institutions of the Western legal tradition continue to influence New South Wales and the Australian legal system, the extent to which it does influence has decreased over time. The concepts and institutions of the Western legal†¦show more content†¦The formation of these courts proved to be extremely influential to the colony of New South Wales and the development of Australian law as judicial decisions from cases such as Kable v Captain Sinclair (1788) proved crucial for the maturing of the Australian legal system through the legislative establishment of the British law concept of the rule of law. As well as this the institution of the court system also created Australia’s own doctrine of precedence. In 1828 the British Parliament enacted the Australian Courts Act (Vines p.174) which stated that all applicable common laws and statutes in force in England on the 28th of July 1828, would apply in the colony. This is known as the date of the Doctrine of Reception. Examples included, â€Å"general rules of inheritance and protection from personal injuries† (Blackstone Vines p.1760). In 1842 the Western legislative institution was adapted to the colony with the Australian Constitutions Act. A legislative council was established with 24 of the 36 members being elected. In 1855, the New South Wales Government Act gave this legislature the general power to make laws for the good government of the colony. By 1860, all of the Australian colonies, other than Western Australia were governed very much like Britain (Vines p.185). The Colonial Laws Validity Act (Imp) (1865) gave the NSW parliament the right to amend those British legislative and common laws that did not apply to the colony andShow MoreRelatedSocial Determinants of Health10939 Words   |  44 Pages3 The Social, Cultural and Historical Context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians PatDudgeon,MichaelWright,YinParadies, DarrenGarveyandIainWalker OVERVIEW To understand the contemporary life of Indigenous Australians, a historical and cultural background is essential. This chapter sets the context for further discussions about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and issues related to their social and emotional wellbeing and mental health. The historyRead MorePiercing the Corporate Veil in Australia15211 Words   |  61 PagesFord Professor of Commercial Law and Director, Centre for Corporate Law and Securities Regulation The University of Melbourne David B Noakes Solicitor, Allen Allen Hemsley, Sydney, and Research Associate, Centre for Corporate Law and Securities Regulation The University of Melbourne There is a significant amount of literature by commentators discussing the doctrine of piercing the corporate veil. However, there has not been a comprehensive empirical study of the Australian cases relating to this doctrineRead MoreAustralia’s Banking Industry31559 Words   |  127 Pagesconstitute financial product advice as defined under the Corporations Act 2001 (Cwth). Nothing in this document should be construed as a recommendation or statement of opinion intended to influence a person in making an investment decision. The information is made available on the strict understanding tha t the Australian Trade Commission (Austrade) is not providing professional advice. While all care has been taken in the preparation of this publication, Austrade expressly denies liability for any lossRead MoreSample Report Essay4259 Words   |  18 PagesRecommendations). The Findings section, which constitutes the body of the report, is then divided into two subsections, and a number of subsubsections. Executive Summary Table of Contents 1. 2. Introduction Findings 2.1 Mega Environment Economic element Legal/Political element Technological element Socio-cultural/demographic element 3 i 2 2 2 3 4 4 4 6 6 6 7 8 8 8 10 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 2.2 Task Environment Customers and clients Competitors Labour Supply Suppliers Government Agencies 2.2Read MoreStreets Ice Cream Marketing Plan10342 Words   |  42 Pages(PEST)†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦...8 3.1.1 Political†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦8 3.1.2 Economical†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦.9 3.1.3 Social†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦.10 3.1.4 Technological†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦...11 3.1.5 Legal†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦..11 3.1.6 Environmental†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦..12 3.1.7 Infrastructure†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦12 3.2 Market Analysis (Industry Analysis)†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦.12 3.2.1 Definition of theRead MoreReflect Cultural Awareness in Work Practice11472 Words   |  46 Pagescreate a culturally and psychologically safe environment for all personsReview and modify work practices in consultation with people from diverse backgrounds    People who identify with a particular culture have a lot of things in common, eg food, traditional costumes, music and so on. 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Kaplan Higher Education and individual contributors do not purport to provide legal or other expert advice in these materials and if legal or other expert advice is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought. The views expressed by presenters delivering course material by lecture or workshop may not necessarily be those of KaplanRead MoreD octrine of Unconscionability: Its Development and Possibilities9798 Words   |  40 PagesPage 1 Malayan Law Journal Articles/2007/Volume 3/DOCTRINE OF UNCONSCIONABILITY: ITS DEVELOPMENT AND POSSIBILITIES [2007] 3 MLJ xliv Malayan Law Journal Articles 2007 DOCTRINE OF UNCONSCIONABILITY: ITS DEVELOPMENT AND POSSIBILITIES Zahira bte Mohd Ishan LLB (Hons) (IIUM); LLM (London) Lecturer, Faculty of Economics and Management, Universiti Putra Malaysia Introduction The term `unconscionability is protean and used in different ways by different judges and commentators to address a fundamentallyRead MoreFaculty of Law and Management: International Marketing10010 Words   |  41 PagesFaculty of Law and Management School of Business Faculty of Law and Management School of Management International Marketing MKT3IMK Subject Learning Guide 2011 Andrew Gilmore Contents 1.0 Subject information at a glance 3 2.0 Subject description 4 3.0 Learning and assessment 4 3.1 Learning objectives 4 3.2 Assessing the learning objectives 4 3.3 Assessment tasks 5 3.3.1 Overview 5 3.3.2 Case Study 6 3.3.3 Final eamination 6 3.3.4 Group assignment 6 3.4 Assessment

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Nursing Code of Ethics Essay - 1052 Words

Nursing Code of Ethics Introduction Butts and Rich (1-26) point out that effective nursing requires both broad knowledge and a set of well developed abilities and skills. The required tasks, are many and varied and in order to do them properly, care must be taken to respect each patients rights and sensitivities. This is why, according to the authors, nursing care must be guided by a code of ethics. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and discussion of the Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements developed by the American Association of Nurses (ANA 1-2). Content and Clarity of the Code The ANAs Code of Ethics (1-2) consists of several ethical statements called provisions. There are a total†¦show more content†¦However, Fry and Veatch (32) also point out that the Code relies, to at least some extent, on the principles underlying humanist, feminist, and social ethics. The American Nurses Associations Code of Ethics (2) also defines and distinguishes the terms ethical and moral thereby helping nurses to better understand the nature of the principles provided. Specifically, it is noted that: Ethical is used to refer to reasons for decisions about how one ought to act, using the above mentioned approaches. In general, the word moral overlaps with ethical but is more aligned with personal belief and cultural values. Statements that describe activities and attributes of nurses in this Code of Ethics are to be understood as normative or prescriptive statements expressing expectations of ethical behavior (2). Process According to Hook and White (1-7), the ANAs Code of Ethics was originally drawn up and adopted by the organization in 1926. However, during this era this code merely consisted of suggestions for proper and ethical behavior. In 1940, a tentative code consisting of a substantive revision of the earlier code was drawn up and accepted unanimously by the ANA House of Delegates. This code was revised and amended repeatedly over the next decades until in 2001, the existingShow MoreRelatedThe Nursing Code Of Ethics Essay839 Words   |  4 Pagesall careers have a specific code and level of ethics which are incorporated into the daily responsibilities one is expected to perform in their chosen field. For the basis of this paper, I have chosen to write about the nursing code of ethics. Nursing has a professional code of ethics along with the level/employee behavior usually being currently attainable, meaning that the behavior expected is normally exhibited by individuals. (Manias 508). Howev er, although nursing seems to require behavior thatRead MoreThe Nursing Code Of Ethics Essay1164 Words   |  5 PagesAs described in Black, ethics and morals are defining characteristics that guide nursing care. Each play a particular role in the efficacy of each nurse and the way he or she performs within the scope of practice. Morals are established as a rule of conduct in any situation provided and once a nurse is aware of one’s personal beliefs and values, safe and effective client care can be delivered through ethical decision making. Ethical decision making involves a critical analysis of actions beforeRead MoreCode of Ethics - Nursing1475 Words   |  6 Pagesmoral norms which nurses are expected to adhere to and embrace. In a nursing profession, daily decisions have real impact on other people’s lives. The responsibility of such decisions creates the need for nurses to have knowledge and skills that enable them to not only provide physical and psychological care, but also to critique and reflect on the standard of health care practices. For the nurses to do this, they must understand ethics and ways in which to utilize this knowledge in a constructive andRead MoreThe Nursing Code Of Ethics895 Words   |  4 PagesTypically, all careers have a specific code and level of ethics which are incorporated into the daily responsibilities one is expected to perform in their chosen field. For the basis of this paper, I have chosen to write about the nursing code of ethics. Nursing has a professional code along with the level/employee behavior usually being currently attainable, which means that the behavior expected is normally exhibited by individuals. (Manias 508). However, although nursing seems to require behavior thatRead MoreCode of Ethics - Nursing1478 Words   |  6 Pagesmoral norms which nurses are expected to adhere to and embrace. In a nursing profession, daily decisions have real impact on other people’s lives. The responsibility of such decisions creates the need for nurses to have knowledge and skills that enable them to not only provide physical and psychological care, but also to critique and reflect on the standard of health care practices. For the nurses to do this, they must understand ethics and ways in which to utilize this knowledge in a constructive andRead MoreCodes of Ethics in Nursing3690 Words   |  15 PagesCODE OF ETHICS IN NURSING * The fundamental responsibility of the nurse is fourfold: to promote health, to prevent illness, to restore health and to alleviate suffering. * The need for nursing is universal. Inherent in nursing is respect for life, dignity and the rights of man. It is unrestricted by consideration of nationality, race, creed, color, age sex, politics, or social status. * Nurses render health services to the individual, the family and the community and coordinate theirRead MoreForensic Nursing Codes Of Ethics1382 Words   |  6 PagesThe profession of nursing has many vast specialties. Although every specialty, including forensic nursing, has its unique population and scope of practice, every field of nursing can and should utilize the Codes of Ethics from the American Nurses Association. The 2015 Code â€Å"addresses individual as well as collective nursing intentions and actions; it requires each nurse to demonstrate ethical competence in professional life† (ANA, 2015, p. 7). This code can be broken down into nine provisions whichRead MoreNursing Code Of Ethics Essay1253 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction Nursing code of ethics was developed as a guide in carrying out nursing responsibilities in a matter consistent with quality in nursing care and the ethical obligations of the profession (ANA, 2015). The term ethics refers to the study of philosophical ideas of right and wrong behavior (Olin, 2012). There is a total of nine provisions however, throughout this paper I will discuss provisions one through four and express how I plan to utilize these provisions as a new RN. These provisionsRead MoreNursing Is A Code Of Conduct Or Ethics Essay975 Words   |  4 PagesIn any occupation there lies a code of conduct or ethics by which we represent ourselves to our peers, supervisors, and the public. It is within that set of behavior that will determine how people are viewed, treated and impacted. Nursing requires characteristics of professionalism that are detrimental to the outcome of patient care and safety. In the early 1800s, nursing was considered as a position held by people that were dishonest, unfavorable and illiterate. This all changed after Florence NightingaleRead MoreThe Guide to the Code of Ethics for Nursing2525 Words   |  10 PagesGuide to the Code of Ethics for Nursing and address the following objectives. 1. Explain the relationship between Codes of Ethics and Professional Identity? The Code of Ethics and the Professional Identity assume a dependent relationship. Without one the other could not stand alone. When we search for the professional identity of a career we also look at how they were established and what boundaries do they follow. In nursing, as stated by the American Nurses Association â€Å"a code of ethics stands as

The Goal By Eliyahu Goldratt And Jeff Cox - 906 Words

The goal is a novel story written by Eliyahu Goldratt and Jeff Cox. Many copies has been sold worldwide since was first published in 1984. The book has been translated in different languages, which make it easy to read and understand. The reason of the book success is the way how it frames the concept of bottlenecks. Eliyahu Goldratt wrote many other books, such as It’s Not Luck, Critical Chain, Necessary but Not Sufficient and Isn’t It Obvious?. Goldratt was the founder of Theory of Constraint for education. This theory becomes a tool for teachers to use in operation management. The Goal genre is a fiction. The purpose of this book is to understand the theory of Constraints and resolve the bottlenecks. The Goal book is intended to any Operation manager who wants to success in the real business. The goal is a very interesting story. It is more about a plant manager who faces personal and professional challenges. Alex earns a master’s degree in both Engineering and Business Administration. He works as Engineering Manager at UNICO Company, which produces a variety of finished goods for another plant and used as component item. His logical philosophy, family issues, and top management pressure makes him a creative and successful manager in the world of business. The company has 20 million dollars of unsold goods. Many orders are scheduled but not delivered to customers. He has only three months to find a solution, otherwise UNICO has to be closed and sold toShow MoreRelatedThe Goal By Eliyahu Goldratt And Jeff Cox Essay883 Words   |  4 PagesThe goal is a novel story written by Eliyahu Goldratt and Jeff Cox. Many copies have been sold worldwide since was first published in 1984. The book has been translated in different languages, which make it easy to read and understand. The book’s success came through the way how it frames the concept of bottlenecks. Eliyahu Goldratt wrote many other books, such as It’s Not Luck, Critical Chain, Necessary but Not Sufficient and Isn’t It Obvious? Goldratt was the founder of Theory of ConstraintRead MoreThe Goal By Eliyahu Goldratt And Jeff Cox Essay1688 Words   |  7 PagesThe Goal is a novel, written by Eliyahu Goldratt and Jeff Cox in 1984 with the purpose to spread awareness of Goldratt’s ideas about the production line and cost-cutting. In 1979 (5 years prior to â€Å"The Goal†), Goldratt and Creative Output, inc. worked to produce production scheduling software that would, in theory, cut lead time and inventories, and therefore cut costs. The software is called â€Å"OPT† (Optimized Production Technology†, and this is exactly what Goldratt was trying to spread awarenessRead MoreThe Goal : Eliyahu M. Goldratt And Jeff Cox2115 Words   |  9 PagesThe Goal Eliyahu M. Goldratt Jeff Cox Russel Jay Eserjose â€Æ' â€Å"The Novel That is Changing American Business†, The Goal, written by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox is a business novel that is management oriented in order to help and improve operations management. This novel was on the Time Magazine’s list of â€Å"The 25 Most Influential Business Management Books†. It was first published in 1984, but over time it has been revised and republished three times. Goldratt is a business consultant who isRead MoreThe, The Goal, By Eliyahu M. Goldratt And Jeff Cox1245 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"The Novel That is Changing American Business†, The Goal, written by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox is a business novel that is management oriented in order to help and improve operations management. This novel was on the Time Magazine’s list of â€Å"The 25 Most Influential Business Management Books†. It was first published in 1984, but over time it has been revised and republished three times. Goldratt, is a bus iness consultant who is acknowledged for his Theory of Constraints (TOC). He has also publishedRead MoreReport on the Book â€Å"the Goal† by Eliyahu Goldratt and Jeff Cox1590 Words   |  7 PagesReport on the book â€Å"The Goal† by Eliyahu Goldratt and Jeff Cox I really enjoyed this book. It was easy to read and easy to comprehend. The examples used in the book make the main ideas of the book memorable and easy to understand. I loved how the authors described the thinking process of the main character, Alex, in a day to day every person’s situations. To me the main value of this book is that its main concepts are applicable to every business, not just manufacturing facilities. I work in marketingRead MoreThe Goal Is Eliyahu M. Goldratt And Jeff Cox1502 Words   |  7 PagesThe Goal is Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox’s attempt to explain the theory of constraints through the Socratic method in the form of a novel. If nothing else, one must give them credit for the creativity of such a teaching device, cliche and dated as it may seem at times. The setting is 1980s, small town America. The town of Bearington is a manufacturing town, struggling to survive as more and more production facilities are moved overseas. The protagonist, Alex Rogo is a plant manager for strugglingRead MoreThe Goal : A Process Of Ongoing Improvement By Eliyahu M. Goldratt And Jeff Cox2079 Words   |  9 PagesIntroduction: I read the fictional book called, The goal: A process of ongoing improvement by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff cox. Goldratt has an extensive history of writing novels about business problems and their solutions. His list of work includes; The race, The haystack syndrome, What is This Thing Called Theory of Constraints and How Should it be Implemented?, It’s not luck, critical chain, and necessary but not sufficient. With his most recent work being in 2009 called Isn’t it obvious focusingRead MoreThe Goal Is A Business Novel Written By Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt And Jeff Cox1243 Words   |  5 PagesThe goal is a business novel written by Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox. Many copies have been sold worldwide since was first published in 1984. The book has been translated in different languages, which make it easy to read and understand. The book’s success came through the way how it frames the concept of bottlenecks. Eliyahu Goldratt wrote different books, such as It’s Not Luck, Critical Chain, Necessary but Not Sufficient and Isn’t It Obvious? Goldratt was the original founder of TheRead MoreThe Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement Essay1123 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"The Goal† is a book written by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox in 1984. The book is very famous in the management field. In 2004, the author published the third revision of it and celebrated selling over than three million copied of it around the world. Also, the goal book is taught in over than 120 collages. The book was recommended by my professor to be read and summarize as an extra credit. The book is about a plant manger in a manufacturing company, Alex, who was hired in this positionRead MoreThe Goal : A Process Of Ongoing Improvement By Eliyahu M.goldratt And Jeff Cox1414 Words   |  6 Pages Book Report: The Goal Horane Williams MGMT 430: WB1 Sp.15 University of Baltimore Eliyahu M. Goldratt s The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement by Eliyahu M.Goldratt and Jeff Cox has changed the way organizations do business and handle constraints. The Goal tells of a guy name Alex Rogo, whom is a supervisor at a production plant how he helps save his plant. At the beginning his plant was unproductive and faced a lot of constraints within. With his help, the plant

A Cultural Study Of Childbirth In Rural Mexico Essay Example For Students

A Cultural Study Of Childbirth In Rural Mexico Essay OutlineI. make up of a typical home A. living arrangements B. layout of the home II. starting a family A. new home B. becoming pregnant III. child birth A. midwife B. birth setting C. prenatal care D. birth of the child E. postpartum IV. conclusions The rural Mexican culture is made up of many small towns and villages. The social connections among adults in theses areas are relatively intimate because many of these areas are endoga mous communities. Most newly married couples live with the mans parents until they are financially stable enough to purchase land of their own to build on. Though it is less common the couple may decide to live with the wifes parents if the mother and daughter-in-law dont get along (Kay, 1991, p. 367). A typical mexican home or compound as they are commonly called. Consists of the familys private living space, which is likely to be set back from the road. Generally the compound is enclosed by a stone wall and contains several structures. There is the main house which might be a modern type, built of stone and have a metal roof, or the traditional wattle and daub walls with a steep palm-thatched roof. Either way, it is likely to be a one-room house. The traditional house is oval, has a floor of pressed dirt or tile, and two doors but no windows. Inside the windowless house, daylight filters in though the palm thatching. At night a single electric bulb provides light. Also at night, several hammocks are let down from the rafters and the house serves as the familys sleeping quarters. In every compound there is also a separate cooking hut with an open fire. Near the well there will be a raised trough covered, by a palm-thatched roof, for the daily clothes-washing. ! Sometimes there is a small bath house built of sticks interwoven with palm leaves, in which house hold members take their daily baths. The most striking thing about life in the compound is the extent to which various activities inter mingle. The whole compound constitutes an extended living area where there is little or no individual private space (Spielman, 1993). Typically rural mexicans believe that conceptions occurs immediately after a menstrual period. This idea is based on the notion that the uterus opens to release the blood that has been dripping in during the preceding weeks. After the menstrual flow has stopped the uterus is believed to remain open, it is during this time that women it most likely for them to get pregnant (Jordan, 1993, p. 18). Pregnancies are almost exclusively dealt with by midwifes. The first prenatal visit is somewhat special. At this time the pregnant woman and the midwife determine the probable date of birth: nine calendar months from the day following the completion of the womans last menstrual period. Massage is an integral part of the midwifes skills. If the midwife has determined, in the course of the massage, that the baby is in a breech or trans verse position, she will do an inversion. She locates the babys head and hip and by applying strong, even pressure to these parts, shifts the babys body into the more favorable head-down position. The procedure is sometimes painful but since the alternative is a Caesarean section in the capital, the women much prefer to tolerate a few minutes of discomfort. The midwife will do a version as often as necessary from the eight month on, up to the time of birth. She attempts to avoid a breech birth if at all possible and is an expert at tur! ning the baby even when the woman is in labor, as long as the breech is not yet engaged (Jordan, 1993, pp. 21-22). Birth generally takes place in the home but for the birth of a first child it may take place in the mothers parents home. After the onset of labor women continue doing house hold tasks until the labor intensifies to the point that it is no longer possible to finish what they are doing (Jordan, 1993, pp. 23-24). The father of the child is expected to be present at birth, if he is not then any complications that may occur are blamed on his absence. It is also typical for the mother of the woman in labor to be present even if she must travel a great distance (Jordan, 1993, p. 24). Birth usually takes place in a hammock but may progress to the legs of a chair tipped on its side, it is generally what ever the mother feels to be most comfortable. There may be any number of women present the only stipulation is that they them selves must also have given birth. The only male present is the father, he is considered the support person. Typically the father will stand behind the mother lying in the hammock and she will sling her arms up and around his neck, other women will rotate in as the support person. The support person coaches the mother along with the other women present, breathing with her, covering her mouth and nose during pushing and even mirroring the mothers contraction (Jordan, 1993, pp. 23-25). The midwife never ruptures the bag of water, instead it is believed to cushion the ba bies head. It will often times appear externally as a small ball and increase and decrease with con tractions. This action helps to enlarge the perineal area, and makes tearing of this area very rare, but if it should the midwife will send for a doctor to repair it. If after sometime it appears that the contractions need strengthening, a raw egg is given to the mother. As could be expected she immediately regurgitates it, this retching usually stimulates a very strong contraction. If additional stimulation is needed an injection of a B complex vitamin is given (Jordan, 1993, p. 26). Once the babies head appears it is suctioned, and after it complete birth it is placed on the mothers abdomen. The midwife then ties the cord once it has stopped pulsating. She doesnt cut the cord until the afterbirth has passed. If the placenta is not expelled within a half an hour or is not completely expelled the midwife will send for a doctor to manually extract it. If the baby is a girl she will, wi thin a hour, have her ears pierced, it is done early so that the babies attention will not be focused and she will not feel it (Jordan, 1993, pp. 28-29). During and after the birth the mother and child are consid ered to be susceptible to evil spirits from the bush. As a result the doors are kept closed and cracks are stuffed with rags to prevent the spirits form entering (Minturn, 1984, p. 206). This is also the reason for the mother and infant remaining indoors for seven days after the birth. The midwife will return the next day to examine the baby and talk with the mother. She will also return twenty days after the birth. At this visit she will give a massage, and applies binders to the mothers head, breast and pelvic areas in order to close the birthing bones. Though the head and breast binder may be removed when ever they become uncomfortable, the pelvic binder is left in place continu ally after giving birth. Also at this visit the midwife formally terminates the childbirth pr ecess (Jordan, 1993, p. 30). New borns are constantly in contact with someone unless they are asleep. Though bottle feeding is status symbol, babies are exclusively breast feed, though some supplemental bottle feeding may occur. Babies are not feed according to a regular time table, but rather when ever they appear hungry or cry (Jordan, 1993, p. 30). In infancy and early childhood, children spend a good deal of their time with their mothers. Mother care for their babies almost exclusively for the first month of their lives and are the primary caretakers for the first six months. After this time mothers begin seeking help in caring for their infants. When the mother goes out she make take the older children, but she will leave the nursing baby with a female friend or relative who are also lactating so they can nurse the infant. The most common substitute caretakers when mother goes to do work or visit around the home, are older daughters (Minturn, 1984, p. 202). Up to the age of six years children are give simple tasks at random but are not expected to complete them, after the age of six they are. Also after the age of six the tasks given tend to be gender related, unless their are no females, then the male children will assume the female roles, but females wont assume male roles (Minturn, 1984, pp. 204-205). Childbirth in rural mexico is a time of gathering and celebration (Jordan, 1993, pp. 29-30). It is a natural experi ence that takes place in the home under the careful supervision of an experienced midwife. Though pregnancy typically devoid of any professional medical intervention, birth in their culture is relatively free from any complications and will likely remain that way as long as their heritage is preserved. References Jordan, B. (1993). Birth in four cultures. Montreal: Eden. Kay, M. A. (Ed.). (1991). Anthropology of human birth. Phila delphia: F. A. Davis. Minturn, L., Lambert W. W. (1984). Mothers in six cultures: antecedents of child rearing. New York: J. Wiley. Spielman, G. (1993). Interview. 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